U.S.

US-flag-and-eagle

PerryScope By Perry Diaz For more than a quarter of a century, the United States enjoyed the distinction of being the sole superpower in a unipolar world order after the Soviet Union imploded in a day.  This was when then Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev resigned on December 25, 1991 and dissolved the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). What followed was a period that came Read More …

Putin and Xi in Shanghai, May 21, 2014. (Mark Ralston / Courtesy Reuters)

China, Russia, the United States, and the New Superpower Showdown By David Gordon and Jordan Schneider Foreign Affairs This week, Russian President Vladimir Putin has been in China, looking to deepen ties between his country and his neighbor to the south. The trip could mark the start of a new era in U.S.-Russian-Chinese relations, the trilateral relationship that dominated the final decades of the Cold Read More …

Photo Credit: REUTERS/Dita Alangkara/Pool

By J. Berkshire Miller The Diplomat The three countries have stepped up their rhetoric. Now they need to match that with action. Effective trilateral cooperation is never a simple endeavor. Indeed, achieving a worthwhile set of common strategic objectives is difficult enough between two states, let alone throwing a third in – even if it is a likeminded ally. Washington’s three most important allies in Read More …

FILE - Vessels from the China Maritime Surveillance and the Japan Coast Guard are seen near disputed islands, called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea.

Source: Voice of America Reuters China said on Monday that the U.S., Australia and Japan should not use their alliance as an excuse to intervene in territorial disputes in the East China Sea or the South China Sea, and urged them to refrain from inflaming regional tensions. On Friday, Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop, Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and U.S. Secretary of State John Read More …

Missiles

China’s aggressive posture in Asia is triggering an alliance against itself as well as an Asian arms race. By James Luko Nolan Chart China is picking a fight with South Korea, Japan and the Philippines. This is a mistake and is “crossing a line in several ways.” First, China’s aggressive posture has become serious enough to “accelerate” America’s “pivot” to Asia, i.e. U.S. Now rapidly Read More …