Philippine history

“I prefer a government run like hell by Filipinos to a government run like heaven by Americans.” -- Manuel L. Quezon

PerryScope By Perry Diaz If not for three major mistakes, the Philippines would be strong today – politically, economically, and militarily. We could have taken the place of South Korea as the 11th biggest economic power or even Japan as the third biggest economic power. While Japan and the Philippines were devastated in World War II and South Korea ruined during the Korean War, Japan Read More …

Katipunan "Supremo" Andres Bonifacio

PerryScope By Perry Diaz On July 7, 1892, Andres Bonifacio, together with Deodato Arellano, Valentin Diaz, Teodoro Plata, Ladislao Diwa, and Jose Dizon, upon learning of Dr. Jose P. Rizal’s deportation, convened secretly and agreed to form a secret society. The founders called the secret society the Kataastaasang Kagalang-Kagalang na Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan or Katipunan for short. It was also referred to Read More …

The Philippines during the Ice Age.

PerryScope By Perry Diaz Ten years ago I wrote an article at a time when there was a move to partition the Philippines into five independent nations based on ethnic or religious differences. Some Filipinos are of the belief that because of our differences, we are incompatible with one another. They believe that we are better off as separate nations and separate people. The move Read More …

Andres Bonifacio

PerryScope By Perry Diaz Recently, there has been a great deal of interest on one of our heroes and founder of the Katipunan, Andres Bonifacio. Indeed, many are now of the belief that he had been denied the recognition he deserved. A decade ago, I wrote a column, “Was Bonifacio the First President?” that revisited the turbulent times when the revolutionary movement was in disarray; Read More …

A detail of Carlos V. Francisco's First Mass in the Philippines painting

By Tomas Gomez III (Retired business executive and government official, now residing in San Antonio, Texas, originally from Samar.) If it could be shown that the first mass in the Philippines was celebrated NOT on Easter Sunday, March 31, 1521 and NOT in either of the contending venues of Butuan City and Southern Leyte, then the long running historical controversy between the Masao District and Read More …

Valentin-Diaz.1

AS A MATTER OF FACT By Sara Soliven De Guzman The Philippine Star  I am haunted by one of my late father, Maximo V. Soliven’s beautifully written column about Philippine Independence entitled: A Portrait of the Filipino as a hero: In search of himself. This column was written a decade ago on June 12, 1990. I had always kept it, waiting for a perfect day Read More …

In commemoration of Bonifacio Day on November 30, the following article highlights the life of Macario Sakay who fought the Americans during the Philippine-American War.  — PERRY DIAZ By George M. Hizon When fugitive general Artemio Ricarte and Eulalio Diaz were incarcerated by the Americans in mid-April, 1904, another Filipino rebel took over as leader of the revolutionary forces. He was Macario Sakay and he Read More …

By Dahli Aspillera Malaya ‘Bonifacio was not only the Father of the Philippine Revolution. Bonifacio was above all the Father of Philippine Democracy.–Manuel L. Quezon, President, Philippine Commonwealth’ FROM Carmencita Acosta, an email which was a joy to receive, and most fitting to publish on this November 30, Bonifacio Day: Dahli, please don’t forget that your grandfather was at the forefront working for the declaration Read More …

AS I WRECK THIS CHAIR By William M. Esposo The Philippine Star Speaking after they’ve won the Battle of Britain, British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, said these words that have since been immortalized in the pages of history: “Never had so many owed so much to so few.” The few, whom Churchill had referred to, were the brave men and women of the RAF Read More …

Landscape By Gemma Cruz Araneta Antonio Luna read the Noli Me Tangere and its sequel, El Filibusterismo, seditious novels by his friend Jose Rizal, with deep interest and enthusiasm. He must have been so inspired that in a review he wrote for “La Solidaridad” he described the novels as bearing the “ seal of truth” as they vividly exposed the humiliating conditions of colonial society, Read More …