Christmas Truce

Christmas Truce 1914

PerryScope By Perry Diaz In 1914, during the Great War — or World War I as we call it today — the British and French armies were manning the 27-mile Western Front fiercely defending French territory from the advancing German Army. Across the British and French trenches, as near as 200 feet away, the Germans were dug in. What separated the opposing armies was a Read More …

Ceasefire in Ukraine

PerryScope By Perry Diaz (I wrote this article on December 23, 2005 to commemorate the 91st  anniversary of the “Christmas Truce” during World War I in 1914.  One hundred years later after the celebrated “Christmas Truce,” another truce — or ceasefire — took effect in East Ukraine where Ukrainian forces and pro-Russian separatists were fighting for dominance of a huge chunk of Ukrainian territory that Read More …

British and German troops stand together during the Christmas Truce of 1914-15. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

PerryScope By Perry Diaz There is something extraordinary about the Christmas season this year.  There is peace where there were wars not too long ago.  In the Philippines, a framework agreement for the establishment of a Bangsamoro homeland was signed between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Movement (MILF) rebels who have been warring for decades in the island of Mindanao.  And in Read More …

PerryScope By Perry Diaz In 1914, ninety-six years ago, during the Great War — or World War I as we call it today — the British and French armies were manning the 27-mile Western Front fiercely defending French territory from the advancing German Army. Across the British and French trenches, as near as 200 feet away, the Germans were dug in. What separated the opposing Read More …

PerryScope By Perry Diaz In 1914, ninety-one years ago, during the Great War — or World War I as we call it today — the British and French armies were manning the 27-mile Western Front fiercely defending French territory from the advancing German Army. Across the British and French trenches, as near as 200 feet away, the Germans were dug in. What separated the opposing Read More …